Google Translate gets 24 new languages ​​with ‘Zero-Shot Machine Translation’

Google Translate can now translate words, sentences and entire websites into 133 languages. The search giant uses a Zero-Shot machine translation technique that can translate without even looking at an example, thereby greatly speeding up the process.

Google has added 24 languages ​​to Translate. This means that Google Translate now offers translations for 133 languages. Google claims that over 300 million people speak these newly added languages.

Several newly added languages ​​were born from Zero-Shot machine translation , a machine learning model that only sees monolingual text . Simply put, Google has developed an algorithm that can translate into another language without even seeing an example.

As with any translation, these newly added languages ​​are not perfect and there will be some hiccups. Google acknowledged this, but assured that the translations would improve. Google already has a team of native speakers, professors and linguists who continuously contribute to the Google Translate platform.

Here is the full list of new languages ​​that are now available on Google Translate:

  • Assamese: Used by approximately 25 million people in North East India.
  • Aymara: used by about two million people in Bolivia, Chile and Peru.
  • Bambara: used by about 14 million people in Mali.
  • Bhojpuri: Used by about 50 million people in northern India, Nepal and Fiji.
  • Dhivehi: Used by about 300,000 people in the Maldives.
  • Dogri is used by about three million people in northern India.
  • Sheep: used by about seven million people in Ghana and Togo.
  • Guarani: used by about seven million people in Paraguay and Bolivia, Argentina and Brazil.
  • Ilocano: used by about 10 million people in the northern Philippines.
  • Konkani: used by about two million people in Central India.
  • Krio: used by about four million people in Sierra Leone.
  • Kurdish (Sorani): Used by about eight million people, mostly in Iraq.
  • Lingala: Used by approximately 45 million people in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Republic of the Congo, the Central African Republic, Angola and the Republic of South Sudan.
  • Luganda: Used by about 20 million people in Uganda and Rwanda.
  • Maithili: Used by about 34 million people in northern India.
  • Meiteilon (Manipuri): Used by about two million people in Northeast India.
  • Mizo: used by about 830,000 people in North East India.
  • Oromo: Used by about 37 million people in Ethiopia and Kenya.
  • Quechua: used by about 10 million people in Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador and neighboring countries.
  • Sanskrit: Used by about 20,000 people in India.
  • Sepedi: used by about 14 million people in South Africa.
  • Tigrinya: used by about eight million people in Eritrea and Ethiopia.
  • Tsonga: used by about seven million people in Eswatini, Mozambique, South Africa and Zimbabwe.
  • Twi: Used by about 11 million people in Ghana.

It is interesting to note that most of the new languages ​​are not spoken worldwide. But widely used in some local regions. This can help improve literacy rates in underdeveloped parts of the world. Moreover, languages ​​such as Sanskrit were used in ancient times. This can help many translate old scriptures with Google Translate.